Colin Murray and Friends – Thursday, October 16

first_imgListen to the best bits of today’s show, when Colin was joined in the studio by co-hosts Steve Bunce and Alvin Martin, and the special guest was Olympic rowing gold medallist, James Cracknell.last_img

A’s beat Reds in 13th inning on Piscotty home run

first_imgOAKLAND — It was a bullpen war of attrition, and in that scenario, the Athletics have to like their chances.And so it was that Stephen Piscotty lined a home run just over the left field fence (a crew chief review confirmed it) leading off the 13th inning Wednesday night in a 5-4 win over the Cincinnati Reds before what was left of a crowd of 9,096 at the Coliseum.Piscotty’s fifth home run of the season came off Robert Stephenson (0-1), made a winner out of Liam Hendriks (1-0) and pushed the …last_img

“Vermont 1” GC86 GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – May 2, 2011

first_imgView from near “Vermont 1″Five months after the first geocache was placed in Oregon state in May of 2000, geocaching had spread Vermont. “Vermont 1” (GC86) was the first geocache placed in the state of covered bridges and brilliant fall colors.GPS Guy and Michael McNeany placed the Multi-cache on October 15, 2000. More than ten years later, there are now more than 3700 geocaches in Vermont.But Vermont 1 still has a place in local geocachers hearts. The cache has the most Geocaching.com Favorite Points in the state. The difficulty three, terrain three cache has been found more than 100 times. Located among the wooded rolling hills, this cache offers Geocachers scenic views. The first geocacher to log Vermont 1 this year wrote, “This was the find of the month for us! Thanks for the fun cache hunt and keeping this special one active.” Others thanked GPS Guy and Michael McNeany for planning the cache to take geocachers past a roaring waterfall.Waterfall on the way to the cacheContinue your exploration of some of the most engaging geocaches from around the world. Explore all the Geocaches of the Week on our blog or view the Bookmark List on Geocaching.com.Share with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedEnigma #1 – GC448A – GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – November 8, 2012November 8, 2012In “Community”Featured Geocacher of the Month Award WinnersAugust 25, 2011In “Community””Europe’s First” GC43 GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – January 31, 2011January 31, 2011In “Community”last_img read more

A Tale of Two Houses

first_imgAs difficult as it is to meet the requirements for Passivhaus certification, builders and designers have a great deal of leeway in how they approach it. There are just a few big hurdles to clear, including limits on how much energy the building can use and how airtight the building envelope must be.Exactly how a builder accomplishes this is not spelled out. As long as the building meets the standard, it can win certification, either from the Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS) or its European counterpart, the Passivhaus Institut (PHI).At the North American Passive House Network conference last month in Portland, Maine, two designers with very different outlooks detailed their Passivhaus projects, demonstrating that many roads can lead to the same destination.One of them, Andrew Michler, took the unusual step of avoiding foam insulation in the house he designed in the mountains of Colorado: none under the slab, none in the walls, none in the roof.The other, New Mexico architect Vahid Mojarrab, chose components made with rigid foam as a way of achieving Passivhaus performance economically and reliably.Is one better than the other? It all depends on how you look at it. In New Mexico, the aim is to compete in a spec marketIf Michler had the luxury of working on a guest house on his own property, and the time to feel his way through some of the building details, Vahid Mojarrab faced a completely different set of challenges: How to build to the Passivhaus standard with a labor pool familiar only with conventional techniques, and do so quickly and efficiently enough to stay competitive on price.Mojarrab knows the production housing market well. He’s built more than 1,200 houses in Colorado, New Mexico, and California but was first introduced to the Passivhaus standard five years ago in a training program in Champaign, Illinois. “It just made sense to me to be able to take advantage of the airtightness and some of the basic science to achieve a high-performance building,” he said by telephone a week after the Portland conference. “When I came back to Santa Fe, we started investigating how we could incorporate that.“Obviously, the real estate market was in a downturn, so it was really hard to be able to go into the market with something so different and ask more money for it when people where looking around with really depreciated real estate all around the country, especially in our area.”Mojarrab’s plan was to stick as closely as possible to familiar building practices so crews wouldn’t have to learn an entirely new way of construction. He had two other advantages: an investor named Bob Schneck who was wanted to collaborate with Mojarrab to advance Passivhaus building in the region, and energy modeler and “Passivhaus optimizer” Graham Irwin of Essential Habitat in California. The answer: Cellulose, mineral wool, and a crawl spaceMichler’s two-story, 1,200-square-foot house in Masonville, Colorado, is built with 2×4 structural walls insulated with mineral wool batts, taped plywood sheathing, and 14-inch-deep Larsen trusses insulated with cellulose and Roxul Drainboard, a rigid mineral wool insulation.Exterior above-grade walls are rated at R-65 to R-85, depending on how thick they are. Their unusual depth made it impossible for Michler to find an insulation contractor willing to dense-pack them with cellulose. He ended up doing it himself, using weed mat to contain the cellulose between truss cavities, and OSB shelves to divide wall cavities into spaces no more than 7 feet tall to reduce settling.The roof, framed with I-joists, is insulated with a combination of mineral wool batts and cellulose to R-75 (see the section drawing for more details).Michler built the house over a crawl space. The concrete stem walls are insulated on both the inside and outside with Roxul Drainboard to R-40, and the floor consists of 16-inch-deep I-joists insulated with blown-in cellulose to R-58. OSB provides the air barrier.“A lot of people gave me hell for having a crawl space,” Michler said, because it raised concerns about moisture and mold. Although the crawl space will have to be monitored, the design looks viable in the relatively dry climate where he lives.Other details:The windows are triple-glazed Intus units with a solar heat gain coefficient of 0.51 and a U-factor of 0.14.Whole-house ventilation is provided by an Air Pohoda heat-recovery ventilator connected to an earth tube.A 2-kW photovoltaic array (off-grid).Domestic hot water from a solar-electric preheater tank and a 92% AFUE Noritz on-demand propane heater.Heat comes from domestic hot water system, which feeds both a radiant loop in a wall separating the living room from the bathroom in the middle of the house, and a heat coil in the supply side of the heat-recovery ventilator. The HRV runs continuously, drawing 30 watts of electricity to move 62 cfm.A phase-change material called BioPCmat M51 is installed on two walls to help even out spikes caused by solar heat gain.The blower door test measured air-tightness at 0.45 air changes per hour at a pressure difference of 50 pascals (ach50). Michler built the house for $220 per square foot. Time running out to make the right choicesWhat troubled Michler was “the legacy of toxicity” that foam insulation represented. He objects to its high embodied energy, the global warming potential of its blowing agents, and the extremely slow payback of using large amounts of it in a building. Spray polyurethane foam has more than 100 times the greenhouse gas potential as cellulose, he told a conference panel; expanded polystyrene has as much as 18 times the embodied energy as cellulose.“What are the chemical impacts of what we’re doing right now?” he asked.“The industry has kind of baffled us with bullsh**, the foam industry,” he said by telephone, “where they can kind of say, ‘We’ve done this better,’ while totally ignoring all the other science and other issues with their product and then call it green because it’s less damaging. The whole idea with Cradle to Cradle is that you don’t create products that are less damaging; you create products that are more beneficial.“If we’re looking at turning around the ship, so to speak, we don’t have 60 years; we don’t have 15 years. We really have to start talking about the impact of our building sector at this moment,” he continued. “In that sense, I don’t see the race as a marathon, as we often talk about it for payback periods, but as a sprint from start line to finish line.” Start with typical local practice and work with thatBecause of building requirements in Santa Fe, builders were already used to adding a layer of rigid foam insulation on exterior walls. “What we did,” Mojarrab said, “was to take that detail and just bumped it up.”Instead of adding 2 inches of EPS, they added 10 inches of EPS in the form of a panel faced on one side with OSB — half of a structural insulated panel. The 2×6 exterior walls were air-sealed by taping the Zip panels before the SIPs went up, creating an air barrier where it would stay protected from plumbers, electricians, and other subs. With blown-in cellulose in cavities, and the 10 inches of EPS over the sheathing, total wall R-values are 61.“It has to be taped; it has to be taken care of a little bit,” he said of the Zip wall system. “The construction approach has to adjust a little bit, but it wasn’t really a drastic measure. Nobody looked at our details and said, ‘We cannot build this. Oh, it’s so expensive.’”Mojarrab placed 4 inches of EPS insulation beneath the slab. In the roof, he used another 10-inch thick, one-sided SIP in addition to blown-in cellulose in the I-joist framing for a total R-value of 97.Mojarrab’s VolksHouse 1.0 (meaning “People’s House”) came in 6.5% below normal construction costs and was appraised for 35% more than similarly sized houses in the same area.Some of the construction details:Domestic hot water: Solar thermal with an electric backup and an 80-gallon tank.Heating and cooling: A Mitsubishi Mr. Slim ducted minisplit heat pump rated at 8,100 Btu/hour for cooling and 10,900 Btu/hour for heating.Whole-house ventilation: UltimateAir energy-recovery ventilator.Windows: Optiwin. Southern exposure, solar heat gain coefficient of 0.63 and a U-factor of 0.11; east, north and west elevations, solar heat gain coefficient of 0.53 and a U-factor of 0.11.The blower door test measured air tightness at 0.3 ach50.Mojarrab built the 1,700-square-foot, three-bedroom, two-story house for $165 per square foot. It is certified by PHI and also won a New Mexico “Emerald” rating, which Mojarrab says is similar to a LEED-Platinum rating. For Michler, a first-ever Passivhaus designMichler has been living off the grid in the mountains outside of Fort Collins, Colorado, for 20 years. He’s done lots of retrofit work, and built a few houses, but about five years ago, during a construction dry spell, he veered into consulting and writing. He hopes to publish a coffee table book on high-performance building sometime next year.A few years ago, Michler interviewed William McDonough, an influential architect and writer who published a book called Cradle to Cradle in 2002 in which he advocates benign, waste-free design. The interview was pivotal for Michler. When he began designing a guest house for his Colorado property, one of the most important considerations became the selection of the materials that would go into it.Foam insulation manufactured with petrochemicals wasn’t on his list. Although it’s commonly used in many parts of a high-performance house, Michler decided he didn’t want it. “McDonough makes a fantastic case that we really need to look at what a resource is, in general, and not just think about attributes but think about the long stretch,” Michler said by phone a week after the conference. Foam was an important building componentMojarrab’s decision to make rigid foam insulation integral to his design was an easy one. “The reason that we used the EPS for the performance of the building was that it was an easy way to get the performance very quickly,” he said. “We are dealing with production housing, so the people who are building the houses are not very sophisticated. They just put this stuff together.”Using the half-SIPs on exterior walls was very familiar to the crews he worked with. “It’s the detail they are used to,” he said. “They’re not unfamiliar with it, so it can be executed again and again with great success.”Mojarrab continues to tinker with his designs and reduced the amount of rigid foam insulation in subsequent designs. But he thinks it will be difficult to eliminate foam entirely, especially beneath the slab and in the roof assembly.“As we are proceeding, we are really refining our walls,” he said. “I can’t argue with Michler or anyone else when they say that foam doesn’t have any place in their buildings, but at the same time I feel like I’d rather use it for insulation than burn it in my car. It’s available to us. Our builders get it. It makes a better building. Why not use it until we come up with a better solution?”Then, too, there are the pressures of the production housing market in which Mojarrab is working. “What we try to do in all of our projects is to optimize it, to make every dollar count,” he said. “That’s production building. Every dollar counts in overall construction costs.”last_img read more

10 months agoChelsea set their price for Bayern Munich target Callum Hudson-Odoi

first_imgChelsea set their price for Bayern Munich target Callum Hudson-Odoiby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea are demanding big money from Bayern Munich to sign Callum Hudson-Odoi.The Mirror says Chelsea have told Bayern to stump up £40million if they want to sign Hudson-Odoi.The German giants are believed to have had a bid of £20m rejected after being impressed by the 18-year-old.The Stamford Bridge club appear ready to sell the teenager – but not on the cheap.Hudson-Odoi was promised first team opportunities this season but has found playing time limited under Maurizio Sarri. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

HISTORY®S 1 DRAMA VIKINGS RETURNS WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 28 AT 9 PM ETPT

first_imgAdvertisement TORONTO – HISTORY’s #1 drama* Vikings returns on Wednesday, November 28 at 9 p.m. ET/PT. The mid-season five premiere date and exclusive trailer was announced today from San Diego Comic-Con International to nearly 5,000 fans during the Vikings cast panel.In the first half of season five, the divide between the Lothbrok family climaxes with Ragnar’s sons battling each other to rule the world. The long-awaited face-off ends with a strategic victory going to Ivar the Boneless (Alex Høgh Andersen) who vows vengeance on his betrayers with a direct target on Lagertha’s (Katheryn Winnick) back. Last seen in an unstable state and losing her appearance as a fierce Viking warrior, Lagertha is hopeful she will regain her spot in Kattegat as its rightful leader. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Advertisement Season five returns on November 28 with the arrival of a legendary Viking, the famous Duke Rollo (Clive Standen), who causes further upheaval in a Kattegat still reeling from Ivar the Boneless becoming its King. As Bjorn (Alexander Ludwig) and Lagertha flee Ivar’s murderous forces with Bishop Heahmund (Jonathan Rhys Meyers), Ivar’s tyrannical reign over Scandinavia ushers in a new dark age, the likes of which have never been seen. Ultimately, Ivar’s reign will not go unchallenged by the sons of Ragnar and old enemies will become allies to defeat the despot who has declared himself a God on earth. Meanwhile in Iceland, Floki (Gustaf Skarsgård) battles the elements, and his own settlers’ desire for revenge, to forge a Viking colony on the beautiful and desolate landscape.The highly-anticipated season five debut was the most-watched premiere of 2017 on HISTORY,** and reigned as the #1 Canadian drama across all Canadian entertainment specialty for Fall 2017/ Winter2018.***Vikings is the critically acclaimed series from creator and sole writer Michael Hirst (Academy Award® winning film Elizabeth and the Emmy® and Golden Globe® nominated series The Tudors) and is a family saga that tells the remarkable tales of the lives and epic adventures of the raiders and explorers of the Dark Ages. Hirst serves as executive producer along with Morgan O’Sullivan, James Flynn of TM Productions (The Count of Monte Cristo; The Tudors), Sheila Hockin (The Tudors, The Borgias), John Weber of Take 5 Productions (The Tudors, The Borgias), Sherry Marsh and Alan Gasmer. Arturo Interian is executive producer for HISTORY.Vikings is an international Irish/Canadian co-production by TM Productions and Take 5 Productions. MGM Television serves as the worldwide distributor outside of Ireland and Canada. Vikings is produced in association with Corus Entertainment. Season six of Vikings is currently in production in Ireland. Fans can catch up on previous seasons of Vikings on Video-on-Demand.HISTORY® is a Corus Entertainment Inc. network.About Corus Entertainment Inc.Corus Entertainment Inc. (TSX: CJR.B) is a leading media and content company that creates and delivers high quality brands and content across platforms for audiences around the world. The company’s portfolio of multimedia offerings encompasses 44 specialty television services, 39 radio stations, 15 conventional television stations, a global content business, digital assets, live events, children’s book publishing, animation software, technology and media services. Corus’ roster of premium brands includes Global Television, W Network, OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network Canada, HGTV Canada, Food Network Canada, HISTORY®, Showcase, National Geographic, Q107, CKNW, Fresh Radio, Disney Channel Canada, YTV and Nickelodeon Canada. Visit Corus at www.corusent.com.Source:*Numeris PPM Data. SP18 (Jan 1/18 – May 27/18) – confirmed data, 3+ airings. Total Canada/AMA(000). CDN SPEC DIG COM ENG, excludes sports. Ind.2+ and A25-54.**Numeris PPM Data. Jan 1/17-Dec 31/17 – confirmed data. Total Canada/AMA(000). History. Ind.2+ and A25-54.***Numeris PPM Data. FL17 (Aug 28/17 – Dec 31/17), SP18 (Jan 1/18 – May 27/18) – confirmed data, 3+ airings. Total Canada/AMA(000). CDN SPEC DIG COM ENG, excludes sports. Ind.2+ and A25-54.SOCIAL MEDIA LINKS:Follow Corus PR on Twitter @Corus PRFollow HISTORY on Twitter @HistoryTVCanadaFollow HISTORY on Instagram @historychannelcanadaLike HISTORY on Facebook facebook.com/HISTORYCanada Advertisement Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Ontario government doesnt think First Nation man deserves new murder trial

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe province of Ontario is appealing a ruling that ordered a new trial for a First Nation man charged with murder.Last year, an Ontario court ruled that Clifford Kokopenace should get a new trial because he was not tried by a jury of his peers.Lawyers with the province say that doesn’t matter.APTN’s Delaney Windigo has the story.last_img

Alberta government helping new methanol plant with 80M in royalty credits

first_imgThe NDP government has been announcing financing as part of a made-in-Alberta strategy to support diversification in the energy sector.Calgary-based Nauticol announced last fall plans for the new plant, with support from the Western Cree Tribal Council.Methanol is used in making products such as paint, plastic, electronics, shoes and furniture and is used widely in energy applications such as biodiesel.“Nauticol’s major investment in the Peace region means thousands of good jobs and more upgrading of our raw resources into the products the world needs right here at home,” Notley told a news conference in Grande Prairie on Wednesday.“By seizing these opportunities today, we’re making sure our kids and grandkids have new opportunities in a stronger, more diversified energy sector.” GRANDE PRAIRIE, A.B. – Alberta is giving $80 million in future royalty credits for construction of a new methanol plant in the province’s northwest.Premier Rachel Notley says Nauticol Energy is to start construction on the $2-billion plant near Grande Prairie next year with an opening set for 2020.She says the project is expected to create 3,000 jobs.last_img read more

TMC will win all 42 seats BJP zero in Bengal

first_imgAndul(WB): Trinamool Congress supremo and West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee Wednesday claimed that her party will win all the 42 seats Lok Sabha seats in the state and BJP will draw a blank. “I am sure that BJP will not come to power in the country and in West Bengal it will draw a blank this time, down from two seats it got in the last LS polls”, Banerjee told a public rally at Andul in Howrah district in support of TMC candidate footballer-turned-politician Prasun Banerjee. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari Puja Referring to BJP president Amit Shah’s statement at a rally at Kalyani in the state during the day, Banerjee without naming him said “a person has come and said the National Register of Citizens will be implemented in the state when his party comes to power. Let them (BJP) come to power first and then we will show how they dare do it”, she said. Shah had said that NRC would be implemented in Bengal to weed out infiltrators. Banerjee said that election to 300 L S seats is already over and BJP is staring at defeat in the states of Rajshthan, UP, Bihar, Punjab, Gujrat, Tamil Nadu and Delhi. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highway “Now the BJP has turned its eyes on West Bengal. Is it so easy for a party like BJP, whose workers’ minds are infertile like a desert to make inroads in Bengal?” the TMC supremo lashed out. “BJP is not putting its ears to the ground and feeling the pulse of the people. Twelve thousand farmers have committed suicide and three lakh jobs have been done away with,” she said. Referring to the Ram Temple issue, she said BJP is in the habit of raising it during elections. “In the last five years has the party had been able to build even a miniature Ram Temple?” she asked. “Now Narendra Modi is coming to Bengal often and asking for votes. Modi does not know anything about the state,” she said. Referring to demonetisation, which she and her party have often opposed, Banerjee said the Modi government had announced it apparently to stop terrorism. “A day will come when they (BJP) will close down banks saying that there is no money”, she said. Referring to the naxal attack at Gadchiroli in Maharashtra which claimed the lives of 15 policeman, Banerjee said “We have restored peace in Junglemahal area (comrpsising the erstwhile Maoist affected forested areas of Purulia, Bankura and West Midnapore districts). We have establish peace there”. “Let BJP do the same in states like Jharkhand and Maharashtra in dealing with the Naxalites and restore peace,” she added.last_img read more