DDTV: WATCH BRILLIANT VIDEO FROM NEW DONEGAL BAND ADVANCED UTOPIA

first_imgDDTV: A Donegal band which was only created two weeks ago have already released their very first single and video.Advanced Utopia are the futuristic, alternative, indie-pop band that are set to take the local music scene by storm.The band consists of members from Inishowen and Letterkenny and only met TWO weeks ago at a Soundwaves project. The members of Advanced Utopia are Aisling Ni Fhionnain (voice) Keith Watson (digital sounds) Kyle MacCauley (acoustic guitar) Oisin Rafferty (electric guitar) and Jennifer Kilcoyne (violin and voice) writing killer music for the Soundwaves Project.They launched their first single Black and White today and the song was accompanied by a superb video.The band look set for a very, very bright future in the music industry.To watch their video and listen to their new single simply click play on the link above. DDTV: WATCH BRILLIANT VIDEO FROM NEW DONEGAL BAND ADVANCED UTOPIA was last modified: August 4th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:DDTVEntertainmentnewslast_img read more

Ohio Ag Net Podcast | Episode 52 | Trade Tribulations, Poultry Prom, and Dairy Discussions

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The 52nd episode of the Ohio Ag Net Podcast, brought to you by AgriGold, is packed with the agricultural issues of the day.Ty Higgins has some viewpoint on the recent trade dispute between the U.S. and China in which agriculture is caught in the crosshairs as he talks with Mike Steenhoek, executive director of the Soy Transportation Coalition.Matt Reese hears from Jenna Gregorich, bird health programs manager for the Ohio Poultry Association. OPA held their annual banquet this past weekend.Dale Minyo was the Ohio Dairy Producers Association Spring Meeting and visited with ODPA’s Scott Higgins.All that and more fun conversation in the Ohio Ag Net Podcast.last_img

Tariffs, trade and the battle between supply and demand

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Doug Tenney, Leist MercantileSupply bulls and demand bears, two terms you have heard much about the past two months. Earlier this summer it was most apparent a huge tug of war was taking place in regard to corn prices. Supply bulls felt they had the upper hand in prices due to huge unknown prevented planted corn acreage. It was most obvious corn planting had been delayed with each release of the Monday afternoon weekly crop progress report from late April into the first half of June. Prevented planting for corn acres grew with each rain event. The supply bulls were utterly disappointed with the June 28 USDA Acres Report. Corn acres were several million acres higher than expected, a bearish surprise. December CBOT corn closed that day at $4.315, down 19.5 cents.Demand bears could see corn planting was at a record slow pace this spring. Yet, they felt they could win the day, knowing demand was falling week after week. U.S. corn export sales and shipments were on the decline. It was evident Brazil was producing a record corn crop. Further demand reduction was apparent with a huge southeast U.S. pork producer securing cheaper corn from Brazil. Corn from Brazil was cheaper even with freight costs compared to rail from the Midwest. This purchase was for 19 million bushels or eight boats to be imported into North Carolina.At the end of July, old corn basis levels were decades strong across Ohio. Many locations were a plus basis with numbers anywhere from 20 to 50 over the September. Several locations in western Ohio had seen basis weakening ten cents or more compared to earlier in July. Expect lots of volatility for both old and new corn into harvest.Weak demand for corn, soybeans, and wheat with plentiful grain stocks around the world were negative for grain prices last month. Grains were all lower in July compared to June. Corn was down 24 cents for the month, soybeans and wheat down 40 cents for the month. Supply bulls were most frustrated as they expected prices to rally above $5 with corn prevented planted acres expected to be record high. Early August some are already suggesting it will take hot weather along with reduced yield to move December CBOT corn above its June 17 high of $4.73.Late last month President Trump announced a 10% tariff on $300 billion of China goods imported into the U.S. would be effective Sept. 1. This follows the disappointing U.S./China trade talks, which ended days earlier. Our U.S. trade officials had been in China desperately working to secure a trade deal. Those talks ended with zero announcements. The lack of a trade deal was not a surprise to the market. The announcement of another round of trade talks in September was a yawner with no price movement.U.S. Midwest weather was non-threatening for much of July with cooler than normal temperatures. Weather and weak demand combined for a powerful dynamo, leaving supply bulls gasping and sputtering for air, exclaiming, “What about acres?” It reminds us a bull needs to be fed every day. Bullish news has been lacking much of the summer. In an arena of growing world stocks for corn, soybeans, and wheat, a one-hit, one time wonder of prevented planted U.S. corn acres, supply has had monumental difficulty battling demand and weather.The August 12 Monthly Supply and Demand Report is awaited with much anticipation. The market has been starved for fresh news in the weeks following the bearish June 28 Acres Report. It will be October and later before the market has a stronger grasp on corn and soybean acres and yields. The long, drawn out planting season will result in a normal start to harvest for some while it will be delayed for others. Expect a longer and later harvest season than normal.last_img read more

Greenwashed Timber: How Sustainable Forest Certification Has Failed

first_imgFSC largely absent in the tropicsMoney also skews the balance against effective certification in one other important way. Though FSC’s original purpose was to slow tropical deforestation, it has largely been absent from the tropics. Almost 85% of the 492 million acres of forest it has currently certified so far are in North America and Europe. “It’s as if someone outfitted an armada to sail off and fix forest management in the tropics,” says one FSC-watcher, “but instead it sailed off into the North.”The change in direction wasn’t deliberate. Getting certified can be expensive, because of the need to set aside 10% of a forest for conservation, and the cost of improved labor and logging practices. Logging companies in developed countries are often better situated than their tropical counterparts to pay for those changes, or have already made those changes to comply with local laws.The result, says Counsell, is that FSC “is essentially rewarding forestry that’s already better because there is a better forest regulatory regime. It’s failing to transform those countries in the tropics, in the south, where there isn’t a good forest regime, indicating that as a voluntary measure it really isn’t adequate to change practices. And that of course is a big concern.”A 2016 meta-analysis of scientific studies found that FSC certification in the tropics has reduced degradation and improved labor and environmental conditions in the affected forest — no small accomplishment. But other rigorously designed studies looking at overall deforestation indicate that FSC has had little or no effect.That may be yet another money question, says Allen Blackman, an economist at Resources for the Future and lead author of a 2015 study on FSC certification in Mexico. Small-scale, poorly performing logging operations are common in the tropics, and they aren’t the ones likely to get certified. FSC may also have had little effect on deforestation for the simple reason that “a lot of the deforestation in developing countries is not happening associated with forestry operations,” says Blackman.Instead, the driving factor is illegal land use change, meaning conversion of natural forests to palm oil plantations, commercial agriculture, and ranching. The apparent ineffectiveness of certification, Blackman and his co-authors conclude, should “give pause to policymakers” thinking of certification as a tool for addressing deforestation.Combined with the recent evidence of blatant illegality by FSC-certified companies, it might also give pause to consumers who have put their faith in the FSC label. It might give pause to the entire wood products industry, which has profited up to now by turning a blind eye to that illegality. Sooner or later, industry will have to face up to the painful reality that it needs a far more rigorous forest certification scheme, combined with governmental regulation — for instance, to stop those land conversions — if it wants there to be any forests left to profit from in the future. Richard Conniff is a frequent contributor to Yale Environment 360. His articles have appeared in a number of publications, including The New York Times, Smithsonian, and The Atlantic. RELATED ARTICLES Reports of FSC failuresIn a 2014 report, Greenpeace, an FSC member, slammed the organization for standing by as FSC-certified loggers ravaged the Russian taiga, particularly the Dvinsky Forest, more than 700 miles north of Moscow. Greenpeace accused FSC-certified logging companies there of “wood-mining” forests the way they might strip-mine coal, as a nonrenewable resource, and of harvesting “areas that are either slated for legal protection or supposed to be protected as a part of FSC requirements.”In 2015, the U.S. flooring company Lumber Liquidators pleaded guilty to smuggling illegal timber from the last habitat of the Siberian tiger in the Russian Far East. Its main supplier of solid oak flooring was a Chinese company named Xingjia, which held an FSC “chain of custody” certification, meaning it was licensed to handle FSC-certified timber. According to an investigator in the case, another Chinese company marketing to the United States offered to put an FSC label on illegal wood flooring in exchange for a 10% markup.In Peru, investigators determined in 2016 that more than 90% of the timber on two recent shipments bound from the Amazon to Mexico and the U.S. was of illegal origin. In what it called an “unprecedented enforcement action,” the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative last October banned the main exporter in those shipments from the U.S. market. That company, Inversiones La Oroza, still boasts on its website that it “complies with the principles and criteria of Forest Stewardship Council (FSC),” though FSC finally suspended its certification in 2017.In 2015, an undercover investigation implicated an FSC-certified Austrian company, Holzindustrie Schweighofer, in illegal logging in Romania, including some in national parks and other protected areas. An FSC expert panel subsequently recommended that the organization “disassociate” from Holzindustrie Schweighofer based on “clear and convincing evidence” of illegality. FSC opted at first for suspension instead. An outcry from environmentalists soon pushed it to break ties with the company, but FSC is already working on a “roadmap” to bring Schweighofer back into certification. Veto power aids industryMoney questions also handicap FSC in other ways, according to its critics. The organization’s decision-making structure consists of environmental, social, and economic (or industry) chambers, each having an equal vote. But many issues get farmed out to working groups, which can take years to reach a consensus.Lumber certified under Forest Stewardship Council rules carries a distinctive stamp and usually brings higher prices than uncertified wood. (Photo: Gerhard Elsner / Wikimedia Commons)And the reality, says Counsell, is that environmental and social groups typically cannot match the resources and staff hours that logging companies with a financial interest at stake can devote to the process. (Carstensen counters that the environmental and social groups hold their own, in part by their ability to bring media attention to bad behavior.)When a motion ultimately comes to the floor at FSC’s general assemblies, held every three years, each chamber has a veto, meaning the power to block any initiative that goes against its interests. But at the 2017 general assembly, “the development of a voting block by the economic chamber to kill motions,” Grant Rosomon of Greenpeace wrote afterwards, became known as “the red sea” for the red “no” cards industry voters held up in unison.“This was extremely concerning,” said Rosomon, “particularly as high priority issues for the social and environment chambers were voted against without explanation, justification, or prior engagement in the cross-chamber motion preparation process.” He called it “a turning point” in how FSC operates.Industry has also gained sway over FSC because of competition from rival forest-certifying organizations, notably the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC). David Gehl of the Environmental Investigation Agency calls PEFC “basically certification by the industry, for the industry,” minus the social and environmental chambers. Buyers often have trouble distinguishing what Greenpeace calls “fake forest certification” from the real thing. The result is that it’s more difficult for FSC to impose rigorous standards on logging companies. But the danger is that lax standards could turn the FSC into a “fake forest certification” scheme, too. When the Forest Stewardship Council got its start in 1993, it seemed to represent a triumph of market-based thinking over plodding command-and-control government regulation. Participants in the 1992 Rio Earth Summit had failed to reach agreement on government intervention to control rampant tropical deforestation. Instead, environmental organizations, social movements, and industry banded together to establish a voluntary system for improving logging practices and certifying sustainable timber.The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) soon set standards that seemed genuinely exciting to environmental and social activists, covering the conservation and restoration of forests, indigenous rights, and the economic and social well-being of workers, among other criteria. For industry, FSC certification promised not just a better way of doing business, but also higher prices for wood products carrying the FSC seal of environmental friendliness.center_img FSC was not a targetThe cases in China, Peru, and Romania all resulted from undercover operations by the Environmental Investigation Agency, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit. “We didn’t mean to go after FSC,” says David Gehl, that group’s Eurasia programs coordinator. FSC just kept turning up in the same places as a lot of illegal logging, he says.Many logging companies appeared to obtain an FSC certification for management practices on one forest, and then use it to cast a halo over their far more extensive dealings in forests elsewhere, with little regard for sustainability or even legality.Kim Carstensen, director general of FSC International — which is based in Bonn, Germany — says the organization has acted appropriately in those cases. “I would claim that overall, our control systems are robust, solid, and continuously being developed,” he adds. “Nothing is perfect, and of course there are issues with FSC certificates. But we have very many stakeholders who point us to them and make us act on them. We have corrective actions happening constantly, and there is a lot of solidity, I think, in that system.”Simon Counsell, executive director of Rainforest Foundation UK and an early proponent of the forest certification idea, argues that the opposite is true. His frustration with FSC led him to co-found the website FSC-Watch.com, “where you can see many, many scores of examples right across the span of FSC’s life, and all types of forests and plantations, that suggest there are still some very serious systemic problems in the FSC. One of them is that the FSC secretariat is unable and arguably unwilling to control the certifying bodies that are responsible for issuing certifications in FSC’s name.”These certifying agencies often display a lack of expertise on visits to logging operations, says Counsell, along with “the systematic downplaying of problems that are identified, and inadequate attention to fraud and misreporting of information.”That leniency may result partly from being paid directly by the companies they are supposed to audit. The certifiers also “know they can get away with issuing certificates even to companies that are flagrantly breaking the law, without any major repercussions from FSC,” he says. Carstensen counters that FSC takes action based on independent audits of its certifying companies, and that the payment setup is no different from a corporation paying an accounting firms to audit its finances. The World Needs Sustainable ForestrySustainable Forestry Initiative Accused of GreenwashingThe LEED Pilot for WoodLumber Liquidators Will Pay Millions in FinesUSGBC’s Wood-Certification Kerfuffle This post first appeared at Yale Environment 360. A quarter-century later, frustrated supporters of FSC say it hasn’t worked out as planned, except maybe for the higher prices: FSC reports that tropical forest timber carrying its label brings 15 to 25% more at auction. But environmental critics and some academic researchers say FSC has had little or no effect on tropical deforestation. Moreover, a number of recent logging industry scandals suggest that the FSC label has at times served merely to “greenwash” or “launder” trafficking in illegal timber.last_img read more

10 months agoChelsea set their price for Bayern Munich target Callum Hudson-Odoi

first_imgChelsea set their price for Bayern Munich target Callum Hudson-Odoiby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea are demanding big money from Bayern Munich to sign Callum Hudson-Odoi.The Mirror says Chelsea have told Bayern to stump up £40million if they want to sign Hudson-Odoi.The German giants are believed to have had a bid of £20m rejected after being impressed by the 18-year-old.The Stamford Bridge club appear ready to sell the teenager – but not on the cheap.Hudson-Odoi was promised first team opportunities this season but has found playing time limited under Maurizio Sarri. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

10 months agoMan Utd manager Solskjaer hopeful Pogba fit to face Tottenham

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Man Utd manager Solskjaer hopeful Pogba fit to face Tottenhamby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer is hopeful that Paul Pogba will be fit for Saturday’s clash with Tottenham Hotspur.Pogba missed Saturday’s win over Reading due to a knock sustained against Newcastle last week.The Frenchman has been in stunning form since Jose Mourinho’s departure and Solskjaer hopes he can continue that form against Spurs.”Paul has had his knock and has had a few days of treatment back home,” Solskjaer said of Pogba, who initially stayed in Manchester for treatment.”Hopefully, we can get Paul on his feet during this week.” last_img

a month agoRangers boss Gerrard ‘flattered’ by Klopp’s Liverpool plan for him

first_imgRangers boss Gerrard ‘flattered’ by Klopp’s Liverpool plan for himby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveRangers boss Steven Gerrard was happy to hear Jurgen Klopp tipping him as his successor at Liverpool.But he expects and hopes Klopp to be in position at Anfield for many years to come.”I was surprised and flattered at the same time,” Gerrard said when asked about Klopp’s comments. “But when you read the quote really carefully, like I have, it said, ‘if I get sacked tomorrow’ he thinks Steven Gerrard should be the next Liverpool manager.”Jurgen Klopp’s not getting sacked tomorrow. I don’t want him to get sacked tomorrow. He’s doing a fantastic job.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Ohio State trounces Kent State 660 week after loss

OSU players enter Ohio Stadium prior to kickoff against Kent State on Sept. 13. OSU won, 66-0. Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editor Redshirt-freshman linebacker Darron Lee (43) celebrates with senior linebacker Curtis Grant (14) during a game against Kent State on Sept. 13 at Ohio Stadium. OSU won, 66-0.Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editorOne week removed from its first loss of the season, the Ohio State football team jumped out to a 21-0 first-quarter lead on its way to beating Kent State, 66-0.The Buckeyes scored less than two minutes into the game to start things off before scoring touchdowns on six of eight first-half drives Saturday at Ohio Stadium.OSU coach Urban Meyer credited the win partially to the Buckeyes’ advantage in the talent column, and added his team needed a big game coming off a 35-21 loss to Virginia Tech on Sept. 6.“I thought our guys played well,” Meyer said after the win. “Obviously a little talent advantage, but we had to have a game like this.”Redshirt-freshman quarterback J.T. Barrett tied an OSU record with six touchdown passes in the game — five of which came in the first half.Barrett said he already has an idea of what former Buckeye quarterback Kenny Guiton — who set that record against Florida A&M last season — will say to him after the performance.“I can hear KG calling me now, talking about ‘you tied me, you tied me, you didn’t beat me though,’” Barrett said.The Wichita Falls, Texas, native attempted 19 passes in the first quarter alone as Meyer said throwing the ball early and often was a big part of the Buckeyes’ game plan.“Early in the first half I wanted to throw a lot,” Meyer said after the game. “I wanted to force him (Barrett) to make plays, and the receivers — it’s not just him, it’s the whole combination of quarterback/receivers.”OSU tacked on 21 points in the second half to close out the scoring on improve its record to 2-1 on the season.Three different Buckeyes scored the first touchdowns of their college careers as role players saw time in both halves for OSU.Redshirt-freshman tight end Marcus Baugh scored a touchdown in the first half on the first reception of his college career. In the second half, redshirt-freshman H-back Jalin Marshall and freshman running back Curtis Samuel each made it into the end zone for the first time in their OSU careers as well.“I had a smile from my ear to ear,” Marshall said of his first touchdown with the Scarlet and Gray. “And it felt really good.”Barrett totaled 297 passing yards in the first half alone before tacking on 15 more yards in limited second-half action. Sophomore running back Ezekiel Elliott had 65 rushing yards to go with 52 receiving yards before the break, sparking OSU to a 45-0 halftime lead.The Buckeyes’ fast start was aided by two long pass plays on top of steady output from the running game. Redshirt-sophomore wide receiver Michael Thomas took a Barrett pass 63 yards for a touchdown before senior wide receiver Devin Smith scored on a 50-yard catch and run to close out the first-half for OSU.Redshirt-senior running back Rod Smith led the first half scoring with a pair of touchdowns — the first on a short pass from Barrett and the second on the ground from a yard out.On top of the offensive explosion, the Buckeyes’ defense held the Golden Flashes to just 126 total yards as Kent State failed to crack the century mark on the ground or through the air.Junior linebacker Joshua Perry said OSU’s ability to hold Kent State to such a low number in the total yardage column made him even happier than keeping the Golden Flashes off the scoreboard.“That’s the thing that puts a smile on my face,” Perry said after the game. “Shutout is one thing…but when you can hold an offense to that I think it’s really impressive. Like I said, it doesn’t matter who the opponent is, that’s a tough thing to do.”Sophomore running back Ezekiel Elliott (15) stiff arms a defender during a game against Kent State on Sept. 13 at Ohio Stadium. OSU won, 66-0.Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editorSenior tight end Jeff Heuerman sat out the game due to an injury while junior defensive lineman Noah Spence was ruled ineligible by OSU on Friday due to a Big Ten and OSU rules violation.Meyer called the news about Spence — which came out to the public less than 24 hours before the team played Kent State — a “sucker punch,” but said the situation is not yet resolved.“I don’t know much other than he was declared he couldn’t play for this weekend, and what the future holds for him, I don’t know,” Meyer said after the game.Barrett’s 312 passing yards made him the first OSU quarterback to top 300 since Troy Smith in 2006.Redshirt-sophomore quarterback Cardale Jones relieved Barrett in the second half and finished the day two for four on pass attempts for 32 yards and ran for 37 yards on four carries.Samuel finished the day with 15 carries for 100 yards and a pair of touchdowns, while also adding on 40 yards through the air. Elliott added 65 rushing yards and five different Buckeyes had 40 yards or more receiving. Eleven different OSU players recording at least one reception in the game.The OSU defense totaled four sacks, two of which were credited to freshman linebacker Raekwon McMillan, who also led the team with seven total tackles in the game.McMillan said his success on the field Saturday came from his work in practice leading up to the game, which allowed him to come into the game with the right mindset.“I practice hard for the games during the week so the game will be easy,” McMillan said after the game. “I learned from what the guys around me are doing, so I feel like I can play more loose now.”The Buckeyes are scheduled for a bye week before hosting Cincinnati on Sept. 27 at Ohio Stadium. Kickoff is set for 6 p.m. read more

Dave Scotts World of Wonder Migration

first_img KUSI Newsroom May 18, 2019 Categories: Dave’s World Of Wonder, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom, Posted: May 18, 2019 Dave Scott’s World of Wonder – Migration 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) Dave Scott takes a deeper look into migration in his World of Wonder last_img read more