Pensioner dies after car plunges into canal

first_imgAs road fatalities continue to skyrocket, a pensioner succumbed while receiving medical attention at the Suddie Hospital on Saturday, after the car he was driving ended up in a canal along the Danielstown Access Road, Essequibo Coast.Royston Peterson of Lot 12 Devonshire Castle, Essequibo Coast was rescued by passers-by and an occupant of the car he was driving moments after it veered off the roadway while negotiating a turn. The accident occurred at about 22:00h on Friday evening.Based on reports received, the 70-year-old man was taken to the Suddie Hospital in an unconscious state, having reportedly consumed murky water as he was trapped inside the vehicle whilst it was partially submerged in the canal.The Police stated the occupant of the car who escaped unhurt reported that the pensioner had been under the influence of alcohol at the time of the accident. A post mortem is expected to be conducted to determine the cause of his death.Last weekend, at least six persons met their demise following accidents on the East Bank and West Bank of Demerara, and in Berbice. In addition, another two persons lost their lives in two separate accidents on the East Bank of Demerara and on Mandela Avenue in Georgetown.Most of these fatal accidents were as a result of speeding and driving under the influence.last_img read more

Donegal motorists warned over potential rise in petrol and diesel prices

first_imgDonegal motorists are being advised to expect an increase in petrol and diesel prices as a result of a surge in the cost of a barrel of oil.Prices rose on the back of the attacks on two Saudi oil processing plants on Saturday.The drone strikes on national energy giant Aramco’s Abqaiq processing plant and Khurais oil field knocked 5.7 million barrels per day off production, more than half of the OPEC kingpin’s output. The attacks also halved output in the world’s top crude oil exporter.The increase in the price of a barrel may not mean anything right now, however, it could have a significant impact on consumers of home heating oils as well as motorists, according to the AA Roadwatch’s director of consumer affairs Conor Faughnan.Mr Faughnan said unless oil prices drop, consumers across the country will start to see an increase in the cost of petrol and diesel in about four to five weeks time.“We’ll find out over the next week or so whether the oil price is going to stay at it’s current high level,” he told RTE. “We simply don’t know – that depends on market movement. But if it does then you will be looking at a significant price increase being evident at Irish pumps in around about 4 to 5 weeks time from now. That’s the normal length of the supply chain.”Crude oil is a naturally occurring type of fossil fuel which is extracted and refined and used for petrol, diesel and home heating products. All of which we use a lot of in Ireland, according to Mr Faughnan.Donegal motorists warned over potential rise in petrol and diesel prices was last modified: September 16th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Takeaways: Sharks call Bennett’s hit ‘gutless’, ‘predatory’

first_imgCALGARY, Alberta — Calgary Flames coach Bill Peters guaranteed it. His team delivered.In a conversation with Sharks coach Pete DeBoer on Monday morning, Peters guaranteed that his team would bring its A-game to the rink in the showdown for first place in the Pacific Division, a response to the Flames’ 1-2-2 record over their previous five games. The Flames showed up and proved just how much offensive fire power they have, scoring eight goals in a romp of the Sharks on home ice.In doing so, …last_img

Ticket sales: The least understood side of the Olympics

first_imgFILE – In this June 20, 2016, file photo, a man handles the Olympic tickets he just purchased at a shopping mall in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Tokyo Olympic organizers launched their ticket website on Thursday, April 18, 2019, which is where only Japan residents can buy tickets when they go on sale on May 9. The site can also be accessed by people outside Japan, where basic prices are listed. But they can’t buy there. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo, File)TOKYO— It’s Olympic ticket sales time again, perhaps the least understood side of the games.“Time flies,” said Kosuke Kitajima, a four-time Olympic swimming gold medalist from Japan. “It’s as if the Rio de Janeiro Olympics were just yesterday.”ADVERTISEMENT Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Under Olympic rules, ticket resellers are appointed by the local national Olympic committee. The reseller for the United States is CoSport, which also handles sales in Australia, Jordan and several European countries. Resellers can mark up the ticket price by 20 percent, which is termed a “handling charge.”However, many sought-after tickets are packaged by resellers with top hotels and other perks, and the markups can be much more than 20 percent. These are aimed at the wealthy, hospitality packages and corporate buyers, for whom price is not always a concern. The resellers also run the risk of getting stuck with tickets they can’t sell.CoSport, a division of Jet Set Sports and based in Far Hill, New Jersey, came under criticism at the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. Not only did buyers have to pay the markups, but they were also penalized by the fluctuation in the exchange rate at that time in Brazil. That was not CoSport’s fault, but it pushed some prices up by another 50 percent to buyers outside Brazil.Hidenori Suzuki, the senior director of tickets for the Tokyo Olympics, said local organizers try to scrutinize the authorized ticket resellers.“In case the resellers set inappropriate ticket prices, there will be some procedures we are getting into,” Suzuki said Thursday, speaking through an interpreter. “The most rigorous case is the ticket reseller might have their license revoked.”ADVERTISEMENT If buyers outside Japan are patient and don’t rush to buy they may get some deals. It happened in Brazil. And it happened at the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics.Tokyo organizers will open sales globally in the spring of 2020, meaning any remaining, unsold tickets can be purchased at the prices offered in Japan. In Rio de Janeiro, many top tickets were unsold as the games neared, and some desirable tickets were put back into the pool after they were sold but never paid for.Tokyo estimates it will have 7.8 million tickets to sell, with 20-30% dedicated to sales outside Japan. Organizers hope to generate about $800 million in ticket sales, a large source of revenue for the $5.6 billion privately funded operating budget.Overall, Japan will spend about $20 billion to prepare for the games, and about 70 percent is public money.Suzuki said the 7.8 million ticket number could change with stadiums and arenas still being configured for seating.“We still lack information about the physical structure and layout of some of the venues,” Suzuki said. “This is the same with past games.”The opening ceremony on July 24 will feature the most expensive ticket — 300,000 yen ($2,680). The most expensive ticket for the closing ceremony is 220,000 yen ($1,965).The most expensive ticket for the men’s 100-meter final is 130,000 ($1,160), while the men’s basketball final goes for 108,000 yen ($970).Tokyo organizers say 50 percent of the tickets will sell for 8,000 yen ($70) or less. The cheapest ticket is 2,500 yen ($22). The now-retired Kitajima helped Tokyo Olympic organizers launch their ticket website on Thursday, where only Japan residents can buy tickets when they go on sale in the host country on May 9. But the useful site can also be accessed in English by people outside Japan, where basic prices are listed along with the full competition schedule.But you can only start to buy if you’re a Japan resident.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsTo purchase tickets, everyone else in the world has to contact what are known as “authorized ticket resellers,” which operate in most major countries. They can’t start selling tickets until June 15 and they are also listed on the website.Buying in the host nation — this time Japan — is straightforward with prices clearly set. But buyers outside Japan need to be careful. They will pay more; sometimes a lot more. MOST READ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue LOOK: Scottie Thompson turns dream into reality with new home DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew LATEST STORIES Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power grid Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Philippine Arena Interchange inaugurated Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte View commentslast_img read more

10 months agoAgent says Atlanta beat Barcelona, Real Madrid to Gonzalo Martínez deal

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Agent says Atlanta beat Barcelona, Real Madrid to Gonzalo Martínez dealby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveThe agent of Atlanta United’s latest signing, Gonzalo Martínez, has revealed interest from Real Madrid and Barcelona.Martinez impressed for River Plate in the recent Copa Libertadores final.”Barcelona and Real Madrid were also interested [in Martínez] but he and his agents saw the potential in the MLS,” agent Guido Albers told De Volkskrant.Martínez, 25, joins Atlanta in a deal worth 15 million euros after starring for River Plate last year. last_img

NHF Provides $2.5 Million for Labour Day Work at Cumberland Road Health Centre

first_imgStory Highlights Renovation of the health facility, located in Spanish Town, St. Catherine, is one of two national projects for Labour Day under the theme ‘Ramp it Up, Fix it Up’. The other is the installation of wheelchair ramps at the St. Ann’s Bay Infant School in St. Ann. The National Health Fund (NHF) has provided $2.5 million for repair works at the Cumberland Road Health Centre on Labour Day, Wednesday, May 23.Renovation of the health facility, located in Spanish Town, St. Catherine, is one of two national projects for Labour Day under the theme ‘Ramp it Up, Fix it Up’. The other is the installation of wheelchair ramps at the St. Ann’s Bay Infant School in St. Ann.The work to be undertaken at Cumberland Road Health Centre will include roof repairs, installation of partitions, bathroom fixtures and kitchen cupboards, painting, and general cleaning and beautification. Additional funds for the project will come from the Ministry of Health.Speaking in an interview with JIS News, Chief Executive Officer of the NHF, Everton Anderson, said that the entity is pleased to support the national Labour Day project.“Public-sector patients should feel comfortable visiting public-sector healthcare facilities, and this project to refurbish the Cumberland Road Health Centre will be used as one of the activities to celebrate the NHF’s 15th anniversary, highlighting our commitment to improving the delivery of healthcare to all Jamaicans,” he said.The work to be carried out forms part of a more extensive project by the NHF to undertake repairs to a number of health facilities on scheduled community workdays to provide a more comfortable and safe environment for users.A total of thirteen (13) community workdays have so far been undertaken across four Regions under endorsement from the Regional Health Authorities. The work to be undertaken at Cumberland Road Health Centre will include roof repairs, installation of partitions, bathroom fixtures and kitchen cupboards, painting, and general cleaning and beautification. Additional funds for the project will come from the Ministry of Health. The National Health Fund (NHF) has provided $2.5 million for repair works at the Cumberland Road Health Centre on Labour Day, Wednesday, May 23.last_img read more

Dont Be Fooled By Baseballs SmallBudget Success Stories

The Houston Astros currently sit on top of the American League West with a 2.5 game lead over the Los Angeles Angels, a team paying Albert Pujols, C.J. Wilson, Jered Weaver, and the rest of the squad a combined $146.4 million. The Astros, meanwhile, will spend less than half that figure on players in 2015. Their total payroll comes in just north of $69 million, 29th out of 30 MLB teams and a remarkable $158 million less than the Los Angeles Dodgers are spending to field a team this year.The success of the Astros and the (comparatively) minuscule payrolls of other plucky small-budget teams is often cited by people trying to advance an egalitarian narrative: that the amount a team spends does not matter. In recent years, Time called the Royals the future of baseball. The New York Times went with Smaller Markets and Smarter Thinking. Baseball America wrote an article asserting, “if you look at competitive balance as the opportunity for teams to make the playoffs and legitimate runs at titles, baseball is truly in a golden era.” Sports Illustrated argued that the average payrolls of playoff teams show that money isn’t the factor it used to be and the Providence Journal offered, “money can’t buy success.” Andrew McCutchen, 2013 National League MVP, is the poster boy for what small-budget teams can accomplish, saying, “Payroll doesn’t mean everything. If that was the case, the Yankees would win every year.”That’s all heart-warming, but evidence suggests that the relationship between money and winning is as strong now as it’s been any time in the free-agency era. Check out the figure below, which shows the relationship between spending and win percentage during each of the three 10-year spans since 1985.1Salary and win percentage were standardized within each season to account for the league’s financial growth and changes in league competitiveness. Data collected from baseball-reference.com. Each team season is one dot in the figure, and the red line reflects a smoothed curve fit through the points. The smoothed curves represent the general relationship between spending and performance for each team season in each decade; aggregating all the decade’s data points shows a pattern: More money generally means more wins.The line gets steeper going from left to right, implying that in recent seasons, jumps in salary have been associated with larger gains in win percentage. Altogether, none of the 20 teams with the highest relative salaries since 1985 have finished below .500. GRAPHIC: Using data from the last 30 years, we created win-pay curves for every team in Major League Baseball. Click here to see how well your favorite team spent its money.J.C. Bradbury, an economics professor at Kennesaw State University, found that winning more increases revenue exponentially. “Going from 85 wins to 90 is worth more than 80 wins to 85,” he says. As a result, while it might cost more per win for a team that wins 90 games than 85, it makes financial sense because the revenue reward will be higher as well. This leads to a self-perpetuating cycle. Additionally, fans of teams that win frequently expect them to continue winning, and management pays more to do so. For a team like the New York Yankees, paying 10 percent more than anyone else for a second baseman who is only 5 percent better than his closest peer is worth the money (and they can afford it).But though the current narrative revolves around small-budget success stories as an argument against the importance of salaries, baseball has always had small-budget overachievers. “Just because you don’t spend money doesn’t mean you can’t win,” Bradbury says. As long as there has been baseball, there have been teams with low payrolls that have exceeded expectations in the win column.Perhaps one reason for the renewed focus on the success of small-budget teams is the importance of playoff success versus the regular season. Postseasons in American sports offer a smaller sample size than, say, soccer’s English Premier League, where the winner is determined by 38 games. In baseball, the better team (the one with the higher payroll) is less likely to prevail over the course of a short playoff series than they would be over an entire season. That, combined with the expansion of the playoffs, means it’s easier for a small-budget team to reach the World Series, as the Kansas City Royals did in 2014, losing to the San Francisco Giants in Game 7. Winning a playoff series can come down to a few factors — a couple of good pitchers and luck — that are less important during the regular season. “The formula seems to be: limp through regular season, get into playoffs, then win,” said Rodney Fort, professor of sport management in the School of Kinesiology at the University of Michigan.Fort, however, also thinks that the case for the relationship between payroll and wins is overstated. “When have we ever been satisfied that a simple relationship between one variable and another variable tells the whole story of the determination of winning?” he says. “What you really need to do is stop and think about what are all the other things: nothing about coaches, nothing about front office/GM acumen.” In Fort’s view, equating payroll and wins leaves out too many other variables.He has a point, as the relationship between salary and winning can be drastically different among different franchises. Some teams don’t get results when they spend more — the New York Mets frowny face is almost too perfect given their fortunes.For a few small-budget teams such as the Cleveland Indians and the Royals, though, there’s a strong relationship between spending and winning.As you can see in the chart of every team’s win-pay curves, spending usually helps, but incompetent spending gets a team nowhere. It’s a waste.Click here to see every team’s win-pay curves. read more

Owners of San Diego UnionTribune considered selling to healthcare billionaire Patrick SoonShiong

first_img Categories: Local San Diego News Tags: San Diego Union-Tribune FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom Updated: 3:27 PM Posted: February 6, 2018 February 6, 2018center_img SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — The San Diego Union-Tribune could soon have a new owner, with a report Tuesday that Chicago-based Tronc plans to sell the paper to health-care billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong.Citing people familiar with the plan, The Washington Post reported that Tronc is working to sell Soon-Shiong the paper it has owned since 2015 as part of a broader deal that will include the sale of the Los Angeles Times. Tronc, previously known as Tribune Co., purchased The Times in 2000.The Times’ newsroom has been in turmoil in recent weeks. A new editor, Jim Kirk, was named in late January following rising concern by staffers over the direction of newsroom management and concerns about the blurring of the line between the news and business departments. Kirk replaced Lewis D’Vorkin, who was moved to the position of chief content for digital and mobile customers.The paper’s publisher, Ross Levinsohn, was placed on unpaid leave following revelations he was a defendant in two sexual harassment suits while working at other companies prior to joining The Times.Most notably, newsroom staffers voted overwhelmingly last month to unionize for the first time in the paper’s 136-year history.Soon-Shiong is the founder and CEO of Culver City-based NantHealth. A representative for Soon-Shiong told The Post he was traveling and unavailable for comment on the report. Owners of San Diego Union-Tribune considered selling to health-care billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong KUSI Newsroom, last_img read more

Revenue Department Says They Are Working to Reopen Online PFD Application

first_imgThere are reports that some applicants have inadvertently seen personal information belonging to other applicants that already filed for the dividend, according to a release from the Department. Revenue Commissioner Bruce Tangeman: “The online security of all Alaskans continues to be our number one priority. We sincerely apologize to all Alaskans for the technical problems and want Alaskans to know we are working as quickly as possible to correct today’s complications and will have the application live once we are confident these issues are resolved.” The state’s information technology systems are managed by the Alaska Department of Administration. In the release: “Its staff is working with Department of Revenue staff to protect Alaskans personal information and will not reopen the site until they are confident that all personal information submitted online for this year’s dividend is both safe and secure.” Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Alaska Department of Revenue closed the online application system for the 2019 Permanent Fund Dividend on Tuesday due to technical issues that were preventing applicants from submitting their applications.last_img read more